Teaching with Primary Sources

Ruby and Rosa: A Journey to Equality

Instructional Design

This is a picture of Ruby Bridges at six years of age.March on WashingtonThis is a picture of Rosa Parks.

1. Ruby Bridges and Rosa Parks: An Introduction to the Journey of Equality

2. Overview

In this series of lessons, students will be introduced to the Civil Rights movement through the lives of Ruby Bridges and Rosa Parks

3. Goal
The goal of this lesson is that students will begin to understand the struggles of African Americans during the Civil Rights Movement, and recognize the contributions of Rosa Parks and Ruby Bridges to the Movement.

4. Objectives
Students will begin to understand the need and reasoning behind the Civil Rights Movement.

Students will develop an understanding of the inequalities between the White population and the African American population prior to and during the Civil Rights Movement.

Students will recognize the achievements of Ruby Bridges, and the contributions that she made to the Civil Rights Movement.

Students will recognize the achievements of Rosa Parks, and the contributions that she made to the Civil Rights Movement.

5.  Investigative Question – On the completion of the lesson students will be able to answer these questions:

What privileges did Whites have prior and during the Civil Rights Movement that African Americans did not have?

Was the difference in privileges and rights fair? Why or why not?

For what is Ruby Bridges famous? How did her actions contribute to the Civil Rights Movement?

For what is Rosa Parks famous? How did her actions contribute to the Civil Rights Movement?

6. Time Required (0-10)
Five twenty-five minute class periods

7. Recommended Grade Range 
Grades 1-3

8. Subject / Sub-Subject
Social Studies

9. Standards
ILLINOIS LEARNING STANDARDS:

.16.A.1: Explain the difference between past, present and future time; place themselves in time.

16.A.1b: Ask historical questions and seek out answers from historical sources (e.g., myths, biographies, stories, old photographs, artwork, other visual or electronic sources).

16.A.1c: Describe how people in different times and places viewed the world in different ways.

16.B.1b (US): Explain why individuals, groups, issues and events are celebrated with local, state or national holidays or days of recognition (e.g., Lincoln's Birthday, Martin Luther King's Birthday, Pulaski Day, Fourth of July, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Veterans' Day, Thanksgiving).

16.B.W (W): Explain the contribution of individuals and groups who are featured in biographies, legends, folklore and traditions.

NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS:

Communication and Collaboration
Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance,
to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others
(Through extension activity)

10. Credits:
Katie Giblin

PREPARATION
1
1. Materials Used
Analysis tools, handouts, rubrics, Power Point slides, etc. needed to conduct the

Primary Sources

The Story of Ruby Bridges by Robert Cole

The Story of Rosa Parks by Patricia A. Pingrey

Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by Doreen Rappaport


PowerPoint (see Resources)

 







 

PROCEDURE
The series of lessons will occur over five days.

Day 1: Stars and Stripes Forever:
As the students come back from lunch, divide the students up into two categories: Stars and Stripes. To differentiate between the two, give nametags with stars to the students in the Star group, and nametags with stripes to the students in the Stripes Group. Offer the Stars group a cookie. Do not offer a cookie to the Stripes group. Allow no explanation as to why some students get cookies, while others do not. As the day progresses, allow the Stars group other privileges: standing in line first, going to the bathroom first, calling on them for answers while ignoring the Stripes group, etc. Other ideas include giving a math quiz to all students, but giving the Stars group the answer in advance. For a deeper impact, divide friends into separate groups, and only allow Stars to talk to other Stars, and Stripes to talk to other Stripes.

At the end of the day, engage students in a whole group discussion. Use the following questions to facilitate the discussion:

*(To the Stripes) How did it make you feel to not get special privileges?
*(To the Stars) How did it make you feel to get special privileges?
*Does anyone know of any time in history when people got more privileges than other people?
*Now that you have seen the impact of some people getting more privileges than others, do you think it is fair?

Using the PowerPoint, introduce the concept of segregation, and document how it made the students responses. Read Martins Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., by Doreen Rappaport, to the students.

Day 2: Segregation and the Civil Rights Movement: Review the topic of segregation with students. Review their comments about how being segregation made them feel. Using the PowerPoint, show students pictures of a classroom for African American students during segregation and a classroom for white students during segregation. Using the PowerPoint, chart the similarities and differences in the pictures.

Day 3: Photo Analysis: Revisit the topic of segregation by having students complete a Photo Analysis of a protest at a lunch counter. Using the PowerPoint, introduce one part of the picture at a time, allowing the students time in between reveals to observe what they notice. Encourage students to use critical thinking skills as the picture is revealed. Discuss the final picture. Explain to the students that during the time of Segregation, African Americans were not allowed to eat in public restaurants and lunch counters. Explain to students that this was changed by people who protested the unfairness until the people in charge were forced to change the law.

Introduce the next slide in the PowerPoint. Allow students to observe the picture of a white woman and an African American woman enjoying lunch at the same counter. Answer the question on the slide: Why is this picture special? Encourage students to use critical thinking skills to answer the question, and document their answers on the slide.

Day 4: Ruby and Rosa
Read The Story of Ruby Bridges by Robert Cole to the students. Using the PowerPoint, document what the students learned in the story about Ruby's contribution to the Civil Rights Movement. Read The Story of Rosa Parks to the students by Patricia A. Pingrey to the students. Using the PowerPoint, document what the students learned in the story about Rosa's contribution to the Civil Rights Movement. Using the PowerPoint, compare the contributions and lives of Ruby and Rosa.

Use the following questions to fa ciliate the discussions:
*How were Ruby and Rosa similar?
*How were Ruby and Rosa different?
*How did Ruby and Rosa change things that were not fair?
*How do you think it made Ruby and Rosa feel
to be treated differently?

Day 5: Culmination

Students will draw a scene from the life of Ruby Bridges or Rosa Parks. Students will explain their illustration to the entire class. Students explanations will be videotaped.

14. Extensions:
Younger Elementary: Students will create a list of words describing Ruby and Rosa
Older Elementary: In groups, students will write a play about the life of either Ruby Bridges or Rosa Park .

Students can take pictures of the artwork or record the play, and edit both into a slideshow/video.

EVALUATION
15. Evaluation
Due to the young age of the students, evaluation will be assessed through observation by the teacher. The teacher will observe for participation in class discussions. The culminating project, consisting of a illustration of a scene from Ruby or Rosa's life, will also be evaluated for accuracy.

 

 

 

 

Governors State University - Teaching with Primary Sources Partner
Katie Giblin
Governors State University
Last Updated on July 22, 2010